100 Plants to Feed the Birds by Laura Erickson

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Synopsis

The growing group of bird enthusiasts who enjoy feeding and watching their feathered friends  will learn how they can expand their activity and help address the pressing issue of habitat loss with 100 Plants to Feed the Birds.  

In-depth profiles offer planting and care guidance for 100 native plant species that provide food and shelter for birds throughout the year, from winter all the way through breeding and migrating periods.

Readers will learn about plants they can add to their gardens and cultivate, such as early-season pussy willow and late-season asters, as well as wild plants to refrain from weeding out, like jewelweed and goldenrod.

Others, including 29 tree species, may already be present in the landscape and readers will learn how these plants support the birds who feed and nest in them. Introductory text explains how to create a healthy year-round landscape for birds. Plant photographs and range maps provide needed visual guidance to selecting the right plants for any location in North America.

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Review

Rating: 5 out of 5.

100 Plants to Feed the Birds: Turn Your Home Garden into a Healthy Bird Habitat by Laura Erickson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This was excellent! I’d recommend it to any gardener, whether novice or expert.

I would like to thank Storey Publishing for providing me with an advance readers copy via access to the galley for free through the NetGalley program.

The Story
Covered a variety of trees and grasses for sanctuary insect pollinators, particularly birds.

It’s very accessible and includes plant care and time commitment for geographical and agricultural zone references for gardening success. Also is speaks to historical information, as well as pros and cons, environmental conscience, and presents ideas through multiple seasons, focusing on birds, which was refreshing to read and unique for this sort of gardening topic.

I enjoyed the historical bits about fireweed.

I was surprised about yellow iris, height of the thistle, and all the variety of berry types that I had not known much about.

The Writing
Well-organized, visually appealing with definitions and tidbits, and great photos.

Really a joy to read and I will look forward to adding a copy reference for my bookshelf.

View all my reviews

What is your favorite bird to attract to your garden?

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