Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Centennial by James A. Michener

Centennial by James A. Michener
Advertisements

Written to commemorate the Bicentennial in 1976, James A. Michener’s magnificent saga of the West is an enthralling celebration of the frontier.

Brimming with the glory of America’s past, the story of Colorado—the Centennial State—is manifested through its people: Lame Beaver, the Arapaho chieftain and warrior, and his Comanche and Pawnee enemies; Levi Zendt, fleeing with his child bride from the Amish country; the cowboy, Jim Lloyd, who falls in love with a wealthy and cultured Englishwoman, Charlotte Seccombe.

Centennial by James A. Michener

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I love these books.

I listened to this one via audiobook narrated by Larry McKeever, who was just the perfect narrator for this series once again. Easy to listen to and I liked his pronunciation of Arkansas.

In today’s world, it is so hard to imagine travel of the time. It took all day just to go 15 miles. The whole family in tow and none of the luxuries of radio, audiobooks, podcasts, A/C or heating, readily available maps, petrol stations, ice chests, or favorite road trip snacks like Black Forest Gummy Bears, Cheetos, or a grande, hot, white chocolate mocha with 2.5 pumps of white chocolate, 1/2 pump of peppermint, with whipped cream- my go-to travel drink from Starbucks.

I started this one over summer, traveling through the mountains of Colorado, it was neat to hear to the commentary of the terrain while visually seeing granite rock layered like a tilted stack of pancakes with edges toward the sky. The erosion, hoodoos, those top heavy rock formations that look like they could topple at any time. Hearing about how it took years of volcanic ash to just drift its way over, the violent collision of tectonic plates, forming areas where mastodons and bison would eventually wander around, once a place where ocean deposited sediment as it peacefully filled the basin of land from melting glacier.

Originally published in 1974, it marries nonfiction accounts of the formation of the Midwest, geographically, population settlement, industry, and relationships with sweet, interesting, sometimes brutal tales of fictional characters so seamlessly integrated into what daily life may have been like in a fascinating, yet incredibly comprehensive historical novel.

50 hours and 5 minutes actually.

Michener was just so clever. I loved the themes, the pacing, the wealth of information.

I loved Rufus the bull story, the beavers, the real origin of horses, and Nacho.

My Favorite Lines

“He tested his scales as carefully as Saint Peter is supposed to test his while weighing souls.”

View all my reviews

Advertisements

Grab some coffee or tea and Join Our Conversation!

What are your thoughts?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest from the Blog

Love and Saffron by Kim Fay

The #1 Indie Next Pick, in the vein of the classic 84, Charing Cross Road and Meet Me at the Museum, this witty and tender novel follows two women in 1960s America as they discover that food really does connect us all, and that friendship and laughter are the best medicine.  When twenty-seven-year-old Joan Bergstrom sends a fan […]

Latest from the Blog

Estée Lauder A Beautiful Life by Aerin Lauder, Jane Lauder

Estée Lauder Youth-Dew Dusting Powder Box Absolutely captivating, with opulent flowers, rich spices, precious woods. Estée Lauder Free 7-Piece GiftYours with any purchase! Life in Beauty “Age is an irrelevancy to every woman. Glow is the essence of beauty, and it’s the absence of radiance that diminishes beauty-at any age.” ~Estée Lauder WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE […]

Moonlight and the Pearler’s Daughter by Lizzie Pook

For readers of The Light Between Oceans and The Island of Sea Women, a feminist adventure story set against the backdrop of the dangerous pearl diving industry in 19th-century Western Australia, about a young English woman who sets off to uncover the truth about the disappearance of her eccentric father. Western Australia, 1886. After months at sea, a […]

Latest from the Blog

Latest from the Blog

100 Plants to Feed the Birds by Laura Erickson

Synopsis The growing group of bird enthusiasts who enjoy feeding and watching their feathered friends  will learn how they can expand their activity and help address the pressing issue of habitat loss with 100 Plants to Feed the Birds.   In-depth profiles offer planting and care guidance for 100 native plant species that provide food and shelter […]

%d bloggers like this: