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Earth by David Brin

Earth by David Brin
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As scientists frantically work to prevent the ultimate disaster, they discover that the entire planet could be destroyed within a year. But while they look for an answer, some claim that the only way to save Earth is to let its human inhabitants become extinct: to reset the evolutionary clock and start over.

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Rating: 3 out of 5.

Earth by David Brin

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Interesting speculations about Earth. I think those more well-versed in environmental science may appreciate it more than I did. I actually started this one July 14, 2018 for a Reading Rush challenge. Coin toss prompt. It was a brother sci-fi recommendation of course. I’m glad I finished it with today’s perspective because I know a bit more about the subject matter than when I started out 2 1/2 years ago. I am wondering if I may have enjoyed it more with the audiobook version.

The Story
Earth from an environmental standpoint, human interaction, anthropology, the effects of commonwealth over other countries, garbage rush.

The most interesting parts for me were about the Maori, disposable diapers, the climbing goats, the baboon. The chapters dedicated to Planet.

I got incredibly bored though. I felt like I was at 36% for forever.

I just don’t know enough about certain subjects to appreciate it and the writing and characters weren’t quite as interesting to keep me in the story like I had hoped. They all read the same to me.

It was the intermix of facts, though they were the same subject matter, weren’t really integrated into the narrative which made them feel rather dry and long-winded. Like a copy-and-paste from an encyclopedia type fashion.

It was hard enough to sift through the things I didn’t know about.

I may have liked it better if the book was cut in half, maybe thirds, maybe fourths. I was getting a little discouraged over the amount of book I had to read through.

Some parts were really clever, insightful, and funny though. Especially the more nuanced ones. Definitely a book I’m glad to have read.

The Writing
Almost like an essay style of writing at times which I quite enjoyed. I also liked the diagrams.

First published in 1990, the speculation was certainly interesting, could have been written today. Maybe I’ll revisit it in the year 2038.

View all my reviews

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Check it out on Amazon

See it on Goodreads

Baboon Crossing, Malawi | Erica Robbin
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