Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Hummingbird Salamander by Jeff VanderMeer

Hummingbird Salamander by Jeff VanderMeer
Advertisements

Synopsis

Security consultant “Jane Smith” receives an envelope with a key to a storage unit that holds a taxidermied hummingbird and clues leading her to a taxidermied salamander. Silvina, the dead woman who left the note, is a reputed ecoterrorist and the daughter of an Argentine industrialist. By taking the hummingbird from the storage unit, Jane sets in motion a series of events that quickly spin beyond her control.

Soon, Jane and her family are in danger, with few allies to help her make sense of the true scope of the peril. Is the only way to safety to follow in Silvina’s footsteps? Is it too late to stop? As she desperately seeks answers about why Silvina contacted her, time is running out—for her and possibly for the world.

Hummingbird Salamander is Jeff VanderMeer at his brilliant, cinematic best, wrapping profound questions about climate change, identity, and the world we live in into a tightly plotted thriller full of unexpected twists and elaborate conspiracy. 

Advertisements

Review

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Hummingbird Salamander by Jeff VanderMeer

My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I could not get into this one for the life of me. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Lisa Flanagan which was pleasant, well-paced. It’s got this speculative element which other readers may enjoy more than I did. I mostly lost interest at mentions of “Looks so antiseptic inside.”

The Story
So boring.

Meandering around the research office, day to day tasks, repetitive efforts like someone lost their keys and re-entered the room asking the same questions over and over again, telling you about the process and account of their day.

Read like this:

I lost my keys. Where are they? Or did I?

In primary school I had to ride the bus. One time the bus driver ran over the curb. A bumpy ride. Sometimes we did fire drills, it prepared me for the drills of life.

Basically it was a pondering of what things could, would, and should be with every mundane task at the office and the most boring parts of life.

The Writing
Repetitive. Again the antiseptic bits.

Fascinating concept, just didn’t capture my interest in execution.

View all my reviews

Grab some coffee or tea and Join Our Conversation!

What are your thoughts?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest from the Blog

Love and Saffron by Kim Fay

The #1 Indie Next Pick, in the vein of the classic 84, Charing Cross Road and Meet Me at the Museum, this witty and tender novel follows two women in 1960s America as they discover that food really does connect us all, and that friendship and laughter are the best medicine.  When twenty-seven-year-old Joan Bergstrom sends a fan […]

Latest from the Blog

Estée Lauder A Beautiful Life by Aerin Lauder, Jane Lauder

Estée Lauder Youth-Dew Dusting Powder Box Absolutely captivating, with opulent flowers, rich spices, precious woods. Estée Lauder Free 7-Piece GiftYours with any purchase! Life in Beauty “Age is an irrelevancy to every woman. Glow is the essence of beauty, and it’s the absence of radiance that diminishes beauty-at any age.” ~Estée Lauder WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE […]

Moonlight and the Pearler’s Daughter by Lizzie Pook

For readers of The Light Between Oceans and The Island of Sea Women, a feminist adventure story set against the backdrop of the dangerous pearl diving industry in 19th-century Western Australia, about a young English woman who sets off to uncover the truth about the disappearance of her eccentric father. Western Australia, 1886. After months at sea, a […]

Latest from the Blog

Latest from the Blog

100 Plants to Feed the Birds by Laura Erickson

Synopsis The growing group of bird enthusiasts who enjoy feeding and watching their feathered friends  will learn how they can expand their activity and help address the pressing issue of habitat loss with 100 Plants to Feed the Birds.   In-depth profiles offer planting and care guidance for 100 native plant species that provide food and shelter […]

%d bloggers like this: