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The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami

From internationally acclaimed author Haruki Murakami—a fantastical illustrated short novel about a boy imprisoned in a nightmarish library.

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From internationally acclaimed author Haruki Murakami – a fantastical short novel about a boy imprisoned in a nightmarish library. Ted Goossen (Translator),  Chip Kidd (Illustrator)

A lonely boy, a mysterious girl, and a tormented sheep man plot their escape from the nightmarish library of internationally acclaimed, best-selling Haruki Murakami’s wild imagination.

Opening the flaps on this unique little book, readers will find themselves immersed in the strange world of best-selling Haruki Murakami’s wild imagination. The story of a lonely boy, a mysterious girl, and a tormented sheep man plotting their escape from a nightmarish library, the book is like nothing else Murakami has written. Designed by Chip Kidd and fully illustrated, in full color, throughout, this small format, 96 page volume is a treat for book lovers of all ages.

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Rating: 5 out of 5.
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The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This was certainly strange, felt very experimental. Symbolism I guess. Symbolism I appreciated when explained in the ending note.

I’d recommend it to those who aren’t afraid to try reading something peculiar and different. I like peculiar, I like different. So I suppose anyone looking for some inspiration or a break in thought, a unique approach to writing and story concept will appreciate this one. It’s short so not exactly a complete waste of your time if you don’t like it. I say that because as I read it, I was like, “Uhhmm ok… what is this… creepy…” Thought about putting it down, worried about what would be next to stomach. Concerned it would be too dark in a dissociative way or reference inappropriate conduct towards a child that I didn’t want to read about.

Looks like it is for kids, it’s super enticing and cute, but not really for kids. Perhaps that is the point, in a paradoxical way. In a tormented, horrid way, but as a child you might actually perceive it that way, in a strong, overwhelming emotional expression, if that makes sense?

I wasn’t sure where the story was headed, but the very last lines made a more complete read for me. It became a deeper connection that I wasn’t expecting and my appreciation for it as a whole was satisfied on a more personal level.

I forgot about card catalogues.

I enjoyed the illustrations, changes in font, and the tactile features done with the paper. It was a unique read for me and I liked that about it, made an impression on me in a way I can’t describe right now.

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